Tag Archive for game music

Beep: A Documentary History of Video Game Sound

Karen Collins is running a KickStarter for a game sound documentary: Beep: A Documentary History of Video Game Sound.

Pledge or read more on KickStarter!

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Most impressive developer-composer handshake story ever

Two weeks ago, while visiting Indievelopment 2013, I posted this tweet:

Most impressive developer-composer handshake story ever 
@indievelopment 2013 Amsterdam / Austin Wintory & 
Robin Hunicke - Journey #gameaudio

You can now view this presentation online!

Live Indie Game Concert in The Netherlands

Last Saturday I visited the Live Indie Game Concert organised by DutchGameMusic. A world first! The following tracks were performed by LUDWIG:
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Interactive Music Theory

Cell-based music / Horizontal Re-sequencing, simple and a more complex example.

I found some theory about interactive, adaptive, nonlinear game music that hasn’t been posted on Captivating Sound yet. It’s an oldie from 2011 by Than van Nispen tot Pannerden, Sander Huiberts, Sebastiaan Donders and Stan Koch.

Interactive music, in e.g. video games, often tends to be complex both in the creative and the technological part. Video games, that have any interactivity connected to the music, often have simplistic music and music technology. The sounding results vary greatly in quality, both in musical aesthetics and in interactive meaningfulness.

One of the interactive music strategies available is horizontal re-sequencing. In this paper experiences with a simple nonlinear music player (the nln-player), using this strategy, are being presented.

Reference:
van Nispen tot Pannerden, T., Huiberts, S., Donders, S., & Koch, S. 2011, The nln-player: A system for nonlinear music in games. Paper presented at Proceedings of the International Computer Music Conference 2011, University of Huddersfield, England.

Download:
http://download.captivatingsound.com/Nispen-Huiberts-Donders-Koch-Interactive-Music-the-NLN-player.pdf

Alternative History of Game Music

At the Utrecht School of the Arts, we’re currently engaged in a research project in which the design processes of game composition are investigated. More about that later…in the meantime, have a look at this alternative representation of the history of game music! [thanks Yme!]

IEZA-framework at Wikipedia

Richard and I have added the IEZA framework for game audio on Wikipedia. This way everyone who uses IEZA can contribute to the further development of this framework and add his or her insights.

IEZA framework can be used to conceptualise the communication by means of game audio

IEZA framework can be used to conceptualise the communication by means of game audio

The URL is:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEZA_Framework

PhD Thesis Captivating Sound: the Role of Audio for Immersion in Games

PhD award

PhD award

The word is out: I hereby present you my PhD thesis! After the final writeup in 2009, it took some time to get my viva arranged in August 2010. Sorry to keep you waiting…but now, it can be downloaded via this blog.

This thesis addresses the role of audio for immersion. Yep, the I-word…almost just as Impossible as it is Irresistible to designers. Yet, I’ve tried to come up with some useful theory for those who want to know more about the design of sound, music and speech in games and the conceptual decisions that are involved.

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Adaptive music prototyping

In 2007, I supervised an internship for the Adaptive Music Systems Research group under Jan IJzermans. The group [1] researched adaptive sound design and composition for games and developed the Adeptive toolkit, which helps composing in nonlinear settings.

To make things clear: we’re not talking about composing a song from the beginning to the end (linear music); the composer makes a large amount of musical ‘cells’ and the system selects new cells based on the rules of the composer (nonlinear music). Such an approach can be highly suitable for games, that mostly have a nonlinear character, as the music is able to correspond with the narrative or the presupposed experience of the player. And at least, we’re preventing the repetitive background track that drives players crazy.

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